Livestock fact check: climate change, yield gaps and more

The LD4D community has released four new factsheets that dig into the data and evidence behind commonly held livestock facts. The latest factsheets investigate claims relating to livestock and climate change, the multiple functions and uses of livestock in Low and Middle Income Countries, the impacts of disease on livestock productivity and the gaps between current and potential yield from livestock. 

This series of factsheets aims to help ensure that facts relevant to the livestock sector are robust, up-to- date and appropriately interpreted, resulting in better-informed discussions around these topics. We welcome your feedback, suggestions and questions – please leave your comments below.

Livestock and Climate Change Fact Sheet
How much does livestock rearing contribute to climate change? And can better management reduce this by up to 30%?

LivestockMultiFunctionalityFactCheck6-t
Livestock Multi-functionality: How significant are the various roles and functions of livestock in Low to Middle Income Countries?

LivestockDiseaseLimitingProductionFactCheck7-t
Livestock Disease Production Burdens: Does disease cause the preventable death of one in four young ruminants and one in ten mature ruminants each year?

LivestockYieldGapsFactCheck8-t
Livestock Yield Gaps: To what extent can livestock productivity be improved?

 


Livestock Fact Check is an ongoing project which investigates and clarifies commonly cited facts about livestock. The livestock factsheets and webinar are produced by the Livestock Data for Decisions (LD4D) community of practice. LD4D aims to drive informed livestock decision-making through better use of existing data and analyses. Learn more at ld4d.org.

LD4D is coordinated by the Supporting Evidence Based Interventions project, based at the University of Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies.

Header image: Forages in Tanzania. Photo: G. Smith (CIAT). Source.

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